Has anyone tried any linux distro's

Demon_skeith

Well-known member
I played with them in college, they are pretty neat though most people will need to download a GUI to be able to use them.
 

Risk

Well-known member
I'd like to use one as my next OS but that could be years away no need to change unless im some how forced or windows does something really stupid.
 

apathy

how'd i get to be so good?
Staff member
I've used Linux as my daily driver for a few years now. Linux is in a pretty good state these days and does pretty much everything I need it to, I rarely find myself booting into Windows but it does happen from time to time.
 

Grungie

Well-known member
I have VM's of Ubuntu, Mint, and Elementary OS. I don't really do anything with them, but beats dual booting.
 

Demon_skeith

Well-known member
Grungie said:
I have VM's of Ubuntu, Mint, and Elementary OS. I don't really do anything with them, but beats dual booting.

VMs do make it easy, as long as you know how to make the right adjustments to them.
 

Grungie

Well-known member
[quote="Demon_skeith" pid='243442' dateline='1614756181']

VMs do make it easy, as long as you know how to make the right adjustments to them.
[/quote]

What adjustments? Like the correct amount of resources to allocate to them? The only minor issue I had setting them up at home was installing VMWare tools on the different distros, as the terminal commands for all 3 I set up had to be slightly different from each other, as opposed to MacOS and Windows VM’s, where you just click on a nice drop down box and it installs automatically for you.
 

apathy

how'd i get to be so good?
Staff member

I can see what he means, VM's are the kind of thing you probably don't set up too often so you can forget certain things like shared folders, and IIRC you need to mess with USB settings to be able to access a memory stick (but it's been about 2 years since I last set one up so maybe I'm wrong there)
 

Grungie

Well-known member
apathy said:
I can see what he means, VM's are the kind of thing you probably don't set up too often so you can forget certain things like shared folders, and IIRC you need to mess with USB settings to be able to access a memory stick (but it's been about 2 years since I last set one up so maybe I'm wrong there)
 

Blackangel

Well-known member
i don't get it lol
and it's about some machine you can install and i am not tech person to understand this
 

apathy

how'd i get to be so good?
Staff member

That's pretty interesting. In VirtualBox you have to click the Machine tab > Settings, click the Shared Folders tab in the window that appears, click the "New" icon, then a new window will appear that has a dropdown that opens the file browser for you to create the folder. It's not difficult obviously but it's a bit more out of the way than what you're describing with VMWare. I've only ever had to set up like 3 VMs before so for people like me it'd be nice if they asked about it in the setup wizard.
 

Grungie

Well-known member
apathy said:
That's pretty interesting. In VirtualBox you have to click the Machine tab > Settings, click the Shared Folders tab in the window that appears, click the "New" icon, then a new window will appear that has a dropdown that opens the file browser for you to create the folder. It's not difficult obviously but it's a bit more out of the way than what you're describing with VMWare. I've only ever had to set up like 3 VMs before so for people like me it'd be nice if they asked about it in the setup wizard.
Tbh I'm not surprised the freeware stuff makes it more of a "pain" than the paid software for basic tasks.

There's definitely times where you go "yup, might as well get the paid stuff"
 
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